as ssd benchmark scores  - Crack Key For U

And if you want the best SSD speeds in town or just prefer macOS, the 16-inch MacBook Pro is still one of the best laptops in this arena. But if. The key rotation manager enables you to refresh the We improved diagnostic logging performance so users with heavier system loads can. What if Gemini 2 activation number doesn't work? Where's my activation key? What's the use of the pie chart on Gemini's scan results screen? as ssd benchmark scores  - Crack Key For U

As ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U -

How can I fix my PC when Windows 10 won’t boot?

I recently ran a free trial of a PC tune-up utility, including a disk clean-up routine, on my Windows 10 laptop. When it restarted, it reported a missing component. Said machine then bricked: boot begins, then the screen blanks.

Are there any steps that I can take to recover access to the machine? Failing that, can I recover my files from the hard drive, installed in a USB cradle?John

Microsoft has spent a lot of time (and money) trying to make Windows self-repairing, partly because it generally gets the blame when other programs – or users – try to “improve” it. Given that tens of thousands of expert programmers have worked on the code over the past 30 years, the number of safe, simple, significant and forwards-/backwards-compatible improvements may be quite small.

If Windows 10 knew you had a blank or even a black screen of death, it would try to fix it. If it can’t fix it, it should switch to the Windows Recovery Environment, otherwise known as Windows RE or WinRE, which boils down to two options:

1) Start Windows in safe mode using the code on the internal hard drive, then use the troubleshooting routines to fix it.

2) Use code on an external device such as a recovery DVD or USB thumbdrive to start Windows, and then repair or replace the code on the internal hard drive.

So, your first aim should be to get to WinRE. From there you can get to safe mode and use the troubleshooting and repair options. If you can’t do that, you will have to – as WinRE puts it – “use a device”.

Starting in safe mode

Safe mode was designed to solve the chicken-and-egg problem that you need to access your PC to fix it, but you can’t access your PC if it won’t start. In theory, WinRE makes it simple to get into safe mode. That’s not working on your laptop, but you can try to force it.

Windows RE is supposed to appear after your PC has failed to boot two or three times. That depends on Windows 10 counting boots correctly, as distinct from restarting from sleep or recovering from some other failure.

However, you are definitely booting your PC if you start with it turned off. To make sure it is off, hold the power button down for at least five seconds. (Touching the power button usually invokes a sleep or hibernation mode where the PC can be woken up by a network connection.) In extremis, you can ensure it’s off by unplugging it from the mains and removing the laptop’s battery, if possible. If not, you can leave it until the battery runs flat then try again.

Before WinRE arrived, you could get into safe mode by pressing a key such as F2 or F8. (You may need to look up which key to press.) That worked when Windows generally took from 40 to 90 seconds to start. It’s impractical with today’s Windows 10 computers, which can start in eight to 10 seconds, but you can still try it. It may bring up WinRE or the UEFI/Trusted Platform Module (TPM) screen – see below.

Once you get into Safe Mode, you can use the troubleshooting and reset or recovery options to repair your PC. Since you have a blank screen problem, it may be worth updating the video graphics driver.

Other troubleshooting options include System Restore, System Image Recovery, Startup Repair, Command Prompt, Startup Settings, UEFI Firmware, and “Go back to previous build”, if there is one.

System Restore would take you back to a setup saved before you ran your tune-up utility. System Image Recovery would depend on you having made a system image backup beforehand. (This is always a good idea.) Otherwise, Windows 10’s troubleshooters cover a wide range of topics, including the old BSoD or Blue Screen of Death. There isn’t one for the Black version, but Microsoft has some online help at Troubleshoot black screen problems.

Use a device

If you can’t fix your PC, then you will need to boot it from a recovery CD or DVD, or from a new copy of Windows 10.

Congratulations if you made a recovery drive before you needed one, by which time it was too late to make one.

If not, you can repair or re-install Windows 10 from a DVD or an 8GB USB thumbdrive. Microsoft provides the code and the instructions online. You don’t need to worry about a product key, because your PC is authenticated online, and your activation data is stored against the Microsoft account email address that you use to log on to Windows 10. However, you do need to worry about the boot order ...

A device to boot

Most PCs are set up to boot from their C drive. You might be lucky and find that a restart will recognize your new USB thumbdrive loaded with Windows 10. If not, you will have to change the boot order, which means changing the settings in an old-style BIOS chip or a new-generation UEFI system. You can do this from WinRE or Safe Mode, if you can get to those. If not, check your PC’s online help files to see if there is a way to do it.

Microsoft uses a tablet-style trick with its Surface range. You press and hold down the volume-up button, then press and release the power button. You can let go of the volume-up control when the Surface logo appears, and then the UEFI/Trusted Platform Module (TPM) screen will load.

The UEFI screen provides the option to “Configure Alternate System Boot Order” and select “USB -> SSD”. Pick whichever order meets your needs.

At this point, it occurs to me that we could all set our PCs to check for a USB boot device before starting from the C drive or SSD. It’s unlikely to add more than a fraction of a second to the start-up time from a cold boot, and how often do you do a cold boot?

Saving your data

Of course, you should never have to worry about the data on your PC’s hard drive, because you back it up every day to an external hard drive. Windows 10 programs can also save files to your Microsoft account’s free OneDrive cloud drive – or to Dropbox, if you have an account – so you can easily save any important files while you are working on them.

Otherwise, yes, you should be able to retrieve your data by mounting the hard drive in an external USB enclosure and plugging this into a different PC.

Windows may decline to access the old files due to the permissions set by the file system. However, you can take ownership of these files using Ownership Changer, which I’ve mentioned previously, or How-To Geek’s Take Ownership Menu Hacks.

An even older option is to use a Live Linux that runs from a DVD or thumbdrive without changing the Windows hard drive. Linux ignores Windows’ permissions. I don’t think I’ve done that this century, but you can find step-by-step instructions online, and Linux Mint looks less of a usability nightmare than the “rescue disc” I used last time.

Backups are even more important now that so many laptops no longer have removable hard drives or SSDs, just Flash memory chips soldered to the motherboard. When those die, your data dies too.

Have you got another question for Jack? Email it to Ask.Jack@theguardian.com

This article contains affiliate links, which means we may earn a small commission if a reader clicks through and makes a purchase. All our journalism is independent and is in no way influenced by any advertiser or commercial initiative. By clicking on an affiliate link, you accept that third-party cookies will be set. More information.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/askjack/2017/apr/20/windows-10-fix-pc-laptop-will-not-boot
Windows

AS SSD Benchmark SSD And HDD Effective Read Write Speed

With AS SSD Benchmark you can determine your SSD drive’s performance by conducting several specific tests. Test the sequential or random read/write performance without using the cache. AS SSD Benchmark reads/writes a 1 GByte file as well as randomly chosen 4K blocks. Additionally, it performs the tests using 1 or 64 threads and it determines the SSD’s access time.

Two extra benchmark tests examine the drive’s behaviour when (1) copying a few big files, a lot of small files and a mixture of file sizes by using cached copy functions of your OS as well as (2) reading/writing data depending on the data’s compressibility. Works great on Microsoft Windows 10.

↓ 04 – Blackmagic Disk Speed Test

Inspire 2 Activation Key of RAW & Apple ProRes

The CineCore 2.0 image processing system includes a high-performance video processor and a high-speed storage system that features a DJI CINESSD and an optimized FAT32/exFAT file system. This allows the Inspire 2 to support CinemaDNG and Apple ProRes recording. Inspire 2 Activation Key of RAW & Apple ProRes unlock these advanced capabilities for high-level filmmaking purposes.

dji license

Inspire 2 Activation Key of RAW & Apple ProRes

An Inspire 2 Activation Key of RAW & Apple ProRes activates the usage permission of CinemaDNG or Apple ProRes inside CineCore 2.0. There are many standards of CinemaDNG or Apple ProRes Activation Keys available for purchase.The purchase of an activation key unlocks a license permanently. No re-purchase or subscription required.Used with the DJI CINESSD and the optimized FAT32/exFAT file system, Activation Keys enable Hollywood-grade video formats to be captured for advanced post-production.

Activation KeyFeaturesSpecs
CinemaDNG Activation Key
  • CinemaDNG support
  • Accurately records all details of a scene
  • Oversampling captures more detail
  • Popular workflow support
  • CinemaDNG:
  • 3840x2160 12bit 23.976*/24*/25*/29.97*/47.952◇ fps
  • 3840x2160 10bit 50/59.94 fps ◇
  • 4096x2160 12bit 23.976*/24*/25*/29.97*/47.952◇ fps
  • 4096x2160 10bit 50/59.94 fps ◇
  • 5280x2972 12bit 23.976/24/25/29.97 fps ◇
Apple ProRes Activation Key
  • Apple ProRes 422 HQ and Apple ProRes 4444 XQ (no alpha) support
  • Oversampling captures more detail
  • Popular workflow support
  • Apple ProRes 422 HQ :
  • 3840x2160 23.976*/24*/25*/29.97* fps
  • 5280x2160 23.976/24/25/29.97 fps
  • Apple ProRes 4444 XQ(no alpha):
  • 3840x2160 23.976*/24*/25*/29.97* fps
CinemaDNG & Apple ProRes Activation Key
  • CinemaDNG and Apple ProRes support
  • Oversampling captures more detail
  • Popular workflow support
  • CinemaDNG:
  • 3840x2160 12bit 23.976*/24*/25*/29.97*/47.952◇ fps
  • 3840x2160 10bit 50/59.94 fps ◇
  • 4096x2160 12bit 23.976*/24*/25*/29.97*/47.952◇ fps
  • 4096x2160 10bit 50/59.94 fps ◇
  • 5280x2972 12bit 23.976/24/25/29.97 fps ◇
  • Apple ProRes 422 HQ :
  • 3840x2160 23.976*/24*/25*/29.97* fps
  • 5280x2160 23.976/24/25/29.97 fps
  • Apple ProRes 4444 XQ(no alpha):
  • 3840x2160 23.976*/24*/25*/29.97* fps

(*) Oversampling used (◇) Only available when using 480G CINESSD

Powerful Performance

Inspire 2 Activation Keys unlock 5.2K CinemaDNG and/or Apple ProRes recording for demanding shoots that require fine image control in post-production.

Format Comparison

Bitrate Comparison

Extraordinary Detail

Oversampling techniques are used to create higher resolution images from the original image recorded by the sensor, capturing more detail in every shot.

Ultra-Efficient Workflow

An efficient workflow is essential to video post processing. With the Inspire 2’s CinemaDNG and Apple ProRes workflows, filmmakers are able to work with their footage more effectively, in turn making editing more efficient. Using the optimized FAT32/exFAT file system, footage can be viewed directly on a computer once the DJI CINESSD is connected, eliminating the need for additional software and further streamlining post-production.

Источник: https://www.dji.com/service/inspire-2-license-key
Linux

jDiskMark SSD And HDD Effective Read Write Speed

Simple Java utility to help benchmark disk IO. Benchmark is done by creating and reading data files to a user directory that can be configured. When doing a combined read and write operation the disk cache is not cleared automatically so the app must be restarted to avoid the cache from affecting read IO performance. Features

  • Disk IO read/write performance
  • Java cross platform solution
  • Saves previous run information
  • Single or multi file option
  • Sequential or random option
  • Detects drive model info
  • Adjustable block size

↓ 07 – Parkdale Trial macOS

AmorphousDiskMark SSD And HDD Effective Read Write Speed

AmorphousDiskMark measures storage read/write performance in MB/s and IOPS. AmorphousDiskMark is designed to measure the megabytes per second and the Input/Output operations per second and display the results in its main window. The app features four types of tests, each featuring a different kind of data block.

  • Sequential 128 KiB block read/write tests with Queue Depth=1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, or 1024
  • Random sequence 4 KiB block read/write tests with Queue Depth=1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, or 1024
  • Sequential 1 MiB block read/write tests
  • Random sequence 4 KiB block read/write tests
  • Read/write MB/s scores
  • Read/write IOPS scores in tooltip
  • Test data: random or zero
  • Test size: 50 MiB, 100 MiB, 500 MiB, 1 GiB, 2 GiB, 4 GiB, 8 GiB, 16 GiB, or 32 GiB
  • Test interval: 0 seconds, …, 10 minutes

↓ 06 – jDiskMark macOS Linux

jDiskMark SSD And HDD Effective Read Write Speed

Simple Java utility to help benchmark disk IO. Benchmark is done by creating and reading data files to a user directory that can be configured. When doing a combined read and write operation the disk cache is not cleared automatically so as ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U app must be restarted to avoid the cache from affecting read IO performance. Features

  • Disk IO read/write performance
  • Java cross platform solution
  • Saves previous run information
  • Single or multi file option
  • Sequential or random option
  • Detects drive model info
  • Adjustable block size

↓ 07 – Parkdale Windows

Passmark Performancetest's Advanced Disk Test SSD And HDD Effective Read Write Speed

This Advanced Disk Test, which is part of PerformanceTest, measures the data transfer speed when reading or writing data to one or more disks. The speed that data can be transferred between memory and a hard disk drive is one of a system’s most important performance aspects. There are quite a few factors which have a bearing on this speed and the Advanced Disk Drive Test allows the user to vary most of these factors and compare the results.

The test supports any drive that can be mounted under Windows. Including IDE drives, SCSI, RAID, USB key drives, SATA, networked shared drives and external drives. Users have the ability to test multiple drives at the same time using multiple threads, and specify:

  • The size of the test file used. Larger files mean that the system cache has less of an effect on the test types, which use caching (see below).
  • The size of the data block used for each read or write request. Larger blocks mean less requests and can lead to an improvement in performance.
  • The choice of four access methods – C/C++ API, Win32 API cached / uncached and raw disk access.
  • Sequential or random access (seeking plus reading and writing)
  • Synchronous and Asynchronous access
  • The split between reading and writing
Источник: https://www.geckoandfly.com/23934/ssd-hdd-effective-read-write-speed/
Raspberry Pi 4 with Samsung 950 Pro NVME SSD

**The new Raspberry Pi bootloader is out which makes these instructions only necessary if you want to continue to use the SD card as a bootloader. View the Raspberry Pi Bootloader Configuration Guide here!**

The Raspberry Pi 4* is finally here and has a lot of exciting changes. One very major downside is that it doesn’t support true USB booting yet out of the box (like the 3 series did). The Raspberry Pi foundation states that it is being worked on and will be added back with a future update. No timeline has been given yet for that to happen but they state it’s one of their top priorities.

Most of my projects heavily depend on having good performing storage so sitting and waiting was not an acceptable solution. In this guide I’ll show you a workaround to use USB devices as your rootfs device and use a Micro SD card as bootloader only which gives us full SSD performance after boot! To see exactly how much of a performance difference this makes (spoiler: it’s gigantic) check out the Raspberry Pi Storage Benchmarks.

I highly recommend doing this on a completely new install. If you try to upgrade your old ones and something goes wrong there’s a good chance you might lose data. We will be modifying the boot partition, resizing partitions, etc. so don’t use a drive with any data on it unless you are positive you have all of the steps down!

Compatible USB Adapters

The Raspberry Pi 4 is proving to be picky about what SATA, M.2, etc. adapters will work in the USB 3.0 port. The USB 3.0 ports are the ones in the middle that are blue inside. The black ones are USB 2.0 and won’t give you the faster speeds the new Pi offers.

It’s very likely that some of these will be fixed via software and firmware updates and the Raspberry Pi Foundation has several open known issues related to USB 3. Until that happens though I will maintain a list here of known working ones and known problematic ones. It’s still very early in the release of the Pi 4 so we still have a lot to learn about which adapters work / don’t work. If you have working and nonworking adapters leave a comment and I’ll add it in this list.

If the adapters worked before on older Pis then one thing you can try is putting them in the black USB 2.0 ports. Obviously this is stupid because we all want the Pi 4 performance gains but if you end up needing to buy a new adapter this will give you a workaround until a replacement arrives!

Find USB adapter chipset

There are certain chipsets used in adapters that are known to be working/not working.

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ lsusb
Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub
Bus 002 Device 002: ID 174c:55aa ASMedia Technology Inc. Name: ASM1051E SATA 6Gb/s bridge, ASM1053E SATA 6Gb/s bridge, ASM1153 SATA 3Gb/s bridge, ASM1153E SATA 6Gb/s bridge
Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0003 Linux Foundation 3.0 root hub
Bus 001 Device 002: ID 2109:3431 VIA Labs, Inc. Hub
Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

This is a lsusb dump of all my connected USB devices. I have bolded the line with the USB bridge device. We can see that the chipset is ASM1153E. This is a really common one that works well with the Pi.

Known Working Adapters

This is a compiled list of known working adapters built by myself from adapters I’ve purchased and commenters from ones they have purchased in this article and my newer guide that utilizes the new Raspberry Pi 4’s native bootloader for USB booting.

Known Problematic Adapters (Naughty List)

Here is a list of common USB adapters that are known to have problems with the Raspberry Pi 4. You can get some of these adapters working by using quirks mode (see the “Fix (some) USB Adapter Problems Using Quirks” section below).

FIDECO M207CPS USB3.2 to M2 NVME/SATA SSD Enclosure*M.2 NVME to USB 3.2 Gen 2Lee Myring reports that the FIDECO M207CPS has issues working with the Pi
UGREEN 30848 as ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U SATA to USB 3.0 Hard Drive Enclosure*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Reporting as not working properly and disconnecting often by Mirco, thanks!
Sabrent USB 3.0 to 2.5″ SATA adapter*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Only works in the USB 2.0 ports. Will not boot in a USB 3.0 port. I have two of these and can confirm they don’t work. RIP to Sabrent, our previous king of the Pi 3 era of adapters.
Sabrent USB 3.0 to 2.5″ SATA Tool-Free External Hard Drive Enclosure*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Another nonworking Sabrent adapter reported by Alex, thanks Alex!
ELUTENG 2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0 Adapter*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Despite earlier reports as working Ryan and one other have reported this adapter does not work as ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U you enable quirks mode! Don’t make Ryan’s sacrifice in vain and avoid this one.
USB 3.0 to 2.5″ SATA III Hard Drive Adapter UASP Support-20cm, Black*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0reported by dzm in the comments as having very poor I/O performance
ORICO 2.5″ SATA to USB C 3.0 Enclosure (Transparent)*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Several commenters have stated the transparent ORICO is not working. Avoid!
ORICO 2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0 Enclosure (Black) 2588US3-BKT*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Commenters report that the USB-C variant of the transparent ORICO enclosure also does not work
ORICO 2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0 Enclosure (Black/White) 2520U3*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Reported as not working by by Richon in the comments
ORICO 2.5″ SATA to USB-C 3.1 Gen 1 Enclosure (Transparent)*2.5″ SATA to USB-C 3.1 Gen 1Confirmed as not working by Andrea De Lunardi in the comments (thanks!)
ORICO 2.5″ SATA to USB 3.1 Gen 1 Enclosure (Silver) M2PF-C3-BK-EP*2.5″ SATA to USB-C 3.1 Gen 2Looks really similar to the ICY BOX. Confirmed not working by auanasgheps in the comments.
Vantec 2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0 USB Adapter with Case*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Does not work after hours of testing and frustration by Moshe Katz in the comments!
AliExpress Generic 2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0 “New USB 3.0 To 2.5in SATA 7+15Pin Hard Drive Adapter”*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Extremely cheap adapter from AliExpress — MADATALIEXPRESS bought 5 of them and none worked, PPCM had one working, very unreliable and slow when it does work, not recommended even if you get lucky!
EWENT USB 3.0 to SATA EW70172.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Does not work – reported by Wouter in the comments, thanks!
CableCreation USB 3.0 to SATA Adapter Compatible 2.5″ SATA III HDD Hard Disk Driver, 0.5FT, Black*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0Morgon reports not working in the comments — I also recognize this adapter as the “fake” StarTech adapter that is sold on AliExpress, thanks Morgon!
JSAUX USB 3.0 to SATA Adapter, USB 3.0 to 2.5 Inch SATA III Hard Drives/SSD/HDD Adapter*2.5″ SATA to USB 3.0 Reported as not working by Bennie in the comments, thanks!

Equipment Used

Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSD

The Samsung 970 EVO Plus is a fantastic drive and has fallen in price substantially. It’s widely available around the world. The smaller capacities (such as the 250GB version) of this drive are perfect for the Pi! This is the top performance option without going into the “Pro” series of the lineup which are much more expensive.

Links: AliExpress.com*, Amazon.ae*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com*, Amazon.com.au*, Amazon.com.mx*, Amazon.co.jp*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.in*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.nl*, Amazon.pl*, Amazon.sa*, Amazon.se*, Amazon.sg*

ICY BOX NVMe Enclosure

The ICY BOX is basically a giant heatsink that you mount a high performance M.2 NVMe drive inside of. This enclosure is as ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U fast but requires a powered USB hub. Not even the 3.5A adapter can reliably power it! The enclosure works well and will physically feel warm to the touch as it is pulling the heat off your NVMe drive!

Links: Amazon.ae*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com*, Amazon.com.au*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.nl*, Amazon.pl*, Amazon.se*, Amazon.sg*

2.5″ SATA Option:

StarTech 2.5" SATA to USB 3.0/3.1 Adapter

Both the USB 3.0 and USB 3.1 variants of the StarTech 2.5″ SATA adapter work well with the Pi 4. I’ve used the 3.0 variant with my Pi 4 since launch and it has always worked well. I later bought the 3.1 variant and had the same positive experience. These two adapter variants are my go to adapters for all my Pi related projects that need a fast and easy 2.5″ SATA SSD!

Links: Amazon.ae*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com*, Amazon.com.au*, Amazon.com.mx*, Amazon.co.jp*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.in*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.nl*, Amazon.pl*, Amazon.sa*, Amazon.se*, Amazon.sg*

Kingston A400 SSD

The Kingston A400 has been a great drive to use with the Pi for years. It’s reliable, widely available around the world, has low power requirements and performs very well. It’s also very affordable. This drive has been benchmarked over 1000 times at pibenchmarks.com and is the #1 most popular SSD among the Pi community!

Links: AliExpress.com*, Amazon.ae*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com*, Amazon.com.au*, Amaz*o*n.com.mx*, Amazon.co.jp*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.in*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.nl*, Amazon.pl*, Amazon.sa*, Amazon.se*, Amazon.sg*

Compact Option:

SanDisk Extreme Pro USB SSD

The SanDisk Extreme Pro USB SSD is a true solid state drive. This is different than a typical “flash drive” which uses extremely cheap memory and has very low random I/O performance/throughput compared to a real solid state drive. I’ve used both the USB 3.1 and USB 3.2 variants with the Pi successfully and they benchmark very well!

Links: AliExpress.com*, Amazon.ae*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com*, Amazon.com.au*, Amazon.com.mx*, Amazon.co.jp*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.in,*Amazon.it*, Amazon.nl*, Amazon.pl*, Amazon.sa*, Amazon.se*, Amazon.sg*

You may use other types of drives with the Pi such as M.2 SATA to USB 3.0 and m-SATA to USB 3.0. Here’s some adapters I’ve used for those types of drives:

m-SATA Enclosure

The VL716 mSATA enclosure lets you connect micro SATA drives to the Pi. These drives are an older type of SSD (usually seen in laptops) predating the M.2 slot but are still widely available and perform extremely well!

Links: AliExpress.com*, Amazon.ae*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com*, Amazon.com.au*, Amazon.com.mx*, Amazon.co.jp*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.in*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.nl*, Amazon.pl*, Amazon.sa*, Amazon.se*, Amazon.sg*

UGREEN M+B M.2 SATA Enclosure

The UGREEN M+B enclosure is a great enclosure for the Pi for M.2 SATA 2280 NGFF drives. It supports both B-key and M-key drives. Does not support newer NVMe drives. As with other types of enclosures it requires more power than other options!

Links: AliExpress.com*, Amazon.ae*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com*, Amazon.com.au*, Amazon.co.jp*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.in*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.nl*, Amazon.pl*, Amazon.sa*, Amazon.se*, Amazon.sg*

Argon ONE Pi 4 Case

The Argon ONE M.2 is a M.2 SATA Pi 4 case / storage solution. With the case and M.2 SATA expansion board you can completely enclosure your Pi 4 and have a built in M.2 slot! The M.2 SATA board is sometimes sold separately from the case itself and can be used as well. Does not support NVMe, this is for SATA M.2 drives only!

Links: AliExpress.com*, Amazon.ae*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com*, Amazon.com.au*, Amazon.com.mx*, Amazon.co.jp*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.nl*, Amazon.pl*, Amazon.sa*, Amazon.se*, Amazon.sg*

Power Requirements

Power can be a serious problem with these drives. We are learning from the comments that you are especially likely to run into power issues with NVMe enclosures. A powered USB hub or a power adapter that puts out 3.5A comes not only just strongly recommended, it may actually be required that you choose one option or the other for your drive to function.

The specific requirements of how much power you’ll need depend on the adapter/enclosure and the model of your drive itself. As a very rough guideline, older models of drives tend to use more power than newer models of drives. 3.5″ form factor drives also use more power than 2.5″ drives. The earliest SSD models like first and second generation models are also well understood to use significantly more power than newer models. This is due to changes and improvements in technology over the years and even using different more efficient memory like 3D NAND. Some super high end performance drives will consume more power as well.

Here’s the current recommendations based on everyone’s comments combined with stuff I’ve personally used with the Pi:

Sabrent Powered USB Hub

The Sabrent powered USB hub delivers a whopping 2.5A of dedicated power for your USB attached devices. This is almost as much as the Pi adapter itself is rated for (3.0A). It will easily power the most thirsty of setups such as NVMe enclosures.

Links: Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com*, Amazon.com.au*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.se*

Note: Make sure Amazon doesn’t try to take you to the non-powered version and that it’s the one with the AC adapter that plugs in to provide extra power

Fixing (some) USB Adapter As ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U Using Quirks

Some of the very common adapters on the naughty list above (such as the Sabrent) can be made to work by using USB quirks to disable UAS mode on the drive. This lowers performance, but it’s still much faster than a SD card and your adapter won’t go to waste.

To find out the quirks we need to find the device ID string for your adapter and then add an entry to cmdline.txt telling the kernel to apply them on boot.

Find Your Adapter

To apply the quirks we first need to get the adapter id. We will use the sudo lsusb command:

$ sudo lsusb Bus 003 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub Bus 002 Device 002: ID 174c:55aa ASMedia Technology Inc. Name: ASM1051E SATA 6Gb/s bridge, ASM1053E SATA 6Gb/s bridge, ASM1153 SATA 3Gb/s bridge, ASM1153E SATA 6Gb/s bridge Bus 002 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0003 Linux Foundation 3.0 root hub Bus 001 Device 002: ID 2109:3431 VIA Labs, Inc. Hub Bus 001 Device 001: ID 1d6b:0002 Linux Foundation 2.0 root hub

On line 2 we can see my ASM1051E SATA 6Gb/s bridge adapter (it’s the known working StarTech.com 2.5″ SATA to USB adapter*). You will see something very similar to mine when you run the command and it shouldn’t be too hard to figure out which device it is. If you need more information add a -v switch to make the command sudo lsusb -v. This can sometimes add some additional details to make it easier to figure out which one is your adapter.

If you’re still not sure, we have another command that between the two that can narrow things down. Type / paste the following:

sudo dmesg grep usb [ 1.332924] usb 2-1: New USB device found, idVendor=174c, idProduct=55aa, bcdDevice= 1.00 [ 1.332957] usb 2-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=2, Product=3, SerialNumber=1 [ 1.332983] usb 2-1: Product: ASM105x [ 1.333006] usb 2-1: Manufacturer: ASMT [ 1.333028] usb 2-1: SerialNumber: 123456789B79F [ 1.335967] usb 2-1: UAS is blacklisted for this device, using usb-storage instead [ 1.336071] usb 2-1: UAS is blacklisted for this device, using usb-storage instead [ 1.336103] usb-storage 2-1:1.0: USB Mass Storage device detected [ 1.336479] usb-storage 2-1:1.0: Quirks match for vid 174c pid 55aa: c00000 [ 1.336611] scsi host0: usb-storage 2-1:1.0

This time we can see in dmesg that UAS was blacklisted for the device and it has loaded with the usb-storage driver instead. This driver tends to be more compatible with the “problematic adapters” but the performance is usually significantly lower. It’s definitely worth a try though as some adapters do better with the quirks performance-wise. The only way to know for sure is to run a benchmark (see storage benchmark section near the end).

USB Boot Instructions

There are a lot of steps to follow to set everything up properly. If you make a mistake the first time don’t spend too much time trying to correct it or figure out what you did wrong. It’s usually faster to burn the images again and reconfigure again rather than try to figure out which step you might have made a typo on. It’s much easier the second time!

Prepare SD Card

Download the latest Raspbian release from https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspbian/. Both Lite or Desktop versions will work. Win32DiskImager (Windows) or balenaEtcher (Linux, Mac OS X, Windows) are highly recommended to burn the images.

Note: Don’t attempt to use raw dd commands to write the images. Too many silly things can go wrong that are checked for/fixed by the recommended programs. Do yourself a big favor and use one of the recommends to avoid spending a ton of time troubleshooting basic imaging problems!

Preparing SSD

We are going to burn a second identical copy of Raspbian to the SSD. This ensures everything the Pi needs to boot is there so we can use the SD card as a bootloader but our actual system will be on our nice fast SSD drive.

Note: Make sure you create the empty file named “ssh” on the boot partition of both drives if you are headless or don’t have a mouse/keyboard attached so you can ssh in on the first boot.

First Boot (SD card only, SSD unplugged)

Insert your freshly imaged SD card into the Pi and connect the power. Sign into the Pi for the first time.

Don’t do an apt-get upgrade/dist-upgrade or any additional configuration yet. Just stick with the instructions until we have finished configuration as ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U since if something goes wrong you may have to start over and any other setup you did will be lost).

Once the Pi has finished booting and you have signed in for the first time plug in your SSD to your Pi’s USB 3.0 ports. The USB 3.0 ports are the ones that have the blue plastic inside instead of the black plastic (the black ones are USB 2.0 ports).

Change PARTUUID

We need to change the PARTUUID of our SSD’s partitions so the Pi doesn’t get confused about what device to boot from. Right now the partitions on both the SD card and the SSD are an exact match and we need them to be different so we can tell the Pi to boot specifically from our SSD’s partition.

We are going to use fdisk to change the SSD’s PARTUUID to the hexadecimal d34db33f to make our SSD easy to identify. Use the following:

$ sudo fdisk /dev/sda Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.33.1). Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them. Be careful before using the write command. Command (m for help): p Disk /dev/sda: 238.5 GiB, 256060514304 bytes, 500118192 sectors Disk model: ASM105x Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disklabel type: dos Disk identifier: 0x6c586e13 Device Boot Start End Sectors Size Id Type /dev/sda1 8192 532479 524288 256M c W95 FAT32 (LBA) /dev/sda2 532480 500118191 499585712 238.2G 83 Linux Command (m for help): x Expert command (m for help): i Enter the new disk identifier: 0xd34db33f Disk identifier changed from 0x6c586e13 to 0xd34db33f. Expert command (m for help): r Command (m for help): w The partition table has been altered. Syncing disks.

That’s it. Let’s verify our change using blkid:

$ sudo blkid /dev/mmcblk0p1: LABEL_FATBOOT="boot" LABEL="boot" UUID="5203-DB74" TYPE="vfat" PARTUUID="6c586e13-01" /dev/mmcblk0p2: Mackeeper download free full version - Free Activators UUID="2ab3f8e1-7dc6-43f5-b0db-dd5759d51d4e" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="6c586e13-02" /dev/sda1: LABEL_FATBOOT="boot" LABEL="boot" UUID="5203-DB74" TYPE="vfat" PARTUUID="d34db33f-01" /dev/sda2: LABEL="rootfs" UUID="2ab3f8e1-7dc6-43f5-b0db-dd5759d51d4e" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="d34db33f-02"

Your /dev/mmcblk0 and /dev/sda devices should now be different from each other. The SD card’s ID is 6c586e13 and the SSD’s PARTUUID is now

Update /boot/cmdline.txt

We are going to change cmdline.txt to point to the SSD for booting instead of the SD card. First make a backup of your existing cmdline.txt file with the following command:

sudo cp /boot/cmdline.txt /boot/cmdline.txt.bak

We’ve now created a backup you can restore if something goes wrong. If you need to restore your backup plug the SD card into a computer/device and replace cmdline.txt with cmdline.txt.bak that we made above. Now your Pi should boot normally again.

Open up /boot/cmdline.txt using nano or your favorite text editor:

sudo nano /boot/cmdline.txt

The existing file will look like this:

console=serial0,115200 console=tty1 root=PARTUUID=6c586e13-02 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline fsck.repair=yes rootwait quiet init=/usr/lib/raspi-config/init_resize.sh

We are going to change the root=PARTUUID section to point to our new d34db33f PARTUUID like the following:

console=serial0,115200 console=tty1 root=PARTUUID=d34db33f-02 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline fsck.repair=yes rootwait quiet init=/usr/lib/raspi-config/init_resize.sh

Make the change and double check the line is what it should be,then press Ctrl+X to save our changes.

Note: cmdline.txt should be one long solid line with no breaks — don’t add any line breaks or the system won’t boot and you’ll need to restore the backup we made earlier!

Test SSD

We are now ready to test booting from the SSD. Restart your Pi by issuing a

sudo reboot

The first boot with your SSD can be slow due to running fsck on the drive. If you have a really large SSD it can take surprisingly long to check all that space. Once the check completes it will mark the drive clean and skip the disk check from now on. It can take over a minute or two sometimes for really big drives so give it at least that much time before assuming it didn’t work.

After signing in we can verify that the SSD is being used like this:

$ findmnt -n -o SOURCE / /dev/sda2

Verify that partition has switched over as shown below to /dev/sda2 (SSD) instead of /dev/mmcblk0p2 (SD card).

Update /etc/fstab

We are now ready to edit the /etc/fstab file to point to our updated drive. To edit the file type:

sudo nano /etc/fstab

Your current file will look like this:

$ cat /etc/fstab proc /proc proc defaults 0 0 PARTUUID=6c586e13-01 /boot vfat defaults 0 2 PARTUUID=6c586e13-02 / ext4 defaults,noatime 0 1sudo nano /etc/fstab

Your current file will look similar to this (PARTUUID varies based on your Raspbian image version):

cat /etc/fstab proc /proc proc defaults 0 0 PARTUUID=6c586e13-01 /boot vfat defaults 0 2 PARTUUID=6c586e13-02 / ext4 defaults,noatime 0 1

We want to change the root ( / ) partition (PARTUUID ending with -02) to load our SSD’s PARTUUID instead of the SD card. Replace the 2nd partition’s PARTUUID field on the last line in the file with the d34db33f label we applied earlier with fdisk. After making the change my /etc/fstab file looks like this:

proc /proc proc defaults 0 0 PARTUUID=6c586e13-01 /boot vfat defaults 0 2 PARTUUID=d34db33f-02 / ext4 defaults,noatime 0 1

Press Ctrl+X to tell nano to save our changes. Now type sudo reboot to restart the Pi.

Note: We want to leave the first partition (/boot) on the SD card. If you change this to the SSD then apt will update as ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U SSD instead of the SD card so they won’t be used during boot! Remember that we are using the SD card as ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U a bootloader and that is why the firmware updates (such as start.elf, etc) should go there instead of the SSD’s boot partition (which is never used).

Resizing Filesystem

By default the partition on the SSD / Flash drive will only be 1.8G. The Pi expands this automatically on micro SD drives but we will need to do it ourselves for a SSD / Flash drive. To do this we need to expand the partition and then resize the file system.

First let’s open fdisk and print the partitions:

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo fdisk /dev/sda Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.33.1). Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them. Be careful before using the write command. Command (m for help): p Disk /dev/sda: 238.5 GiB, 256060514304 bytes, 500118192 sectors Disk model: ASM105x Units: sectors as ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disklabel type: dos Disk identifier: 0xd34db33f Device Boot Start End Sectors Size Id Type /dev/sda1 8192 532479 524288 256M c W95 FAT32 (LBA) /dev/sda2 532480 4390911 3858432 1.9G 83 Linux

There is the line we need. Our start value for /dev/sda2 (rootfs) is 532480. Next we need to remove and recreate the partition as a larger size.

If you make any mistakes during this command just close fdisk by pressing q. The changes won’t be written to disk. If you mess up any of the commands the drive will no longer boot and you’ll have to start over again so be careful!

Command (m for help): d Partition number (1,2, default 2): 2 Partition 2 has been deleted. Command (m for help): n Partition type p primary (1 primary, 0 extended, 3 free) e extended (container for logical partitions) Select (default p): p Partition number (2-4, default 2): 2 First sector (2048-500118191, default 2048): 532480 Last sector, +/-sectors or +/-size{K,M,G,T,P} (532480-500118191, default 500118191): 500118191 Created a new partition 2 of type 'Linux' and of size 238.2 GiB. Partition #2 contains a ext4 signature. Do you want to remove the signature? as ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U N Command (m for help): w The partition table has been altered. Syncing disks.

If everything went well then type “w” and press enter. Otherwise press “q” to quit and try again. Once you enter “w” the changes will be permanently written to disk!

Now reboot the system. Type “df -h” to view the current disk:

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/root 1.8G 1.3G 415M 76% / devtmpfs 1.8G 0 1.8G 0% /dev tmpfs 2.0G 0 2.0G 0% /dev/shm tmpfs 2.0G 8.5M 1.9G 1% /run tmpfs 5.0M 4.0K 5.0M 1% /run/lock tmpfs 2.0G 0 2.0G 0% /sys/fs/cgroup /dev/mmcblk0p1 253M 52M 201M 21% /boot tmpfs 391M 0 391M 0% /run/user/1000

We can see our disk is still 1.8G even after resizing the partition. That’s because we still have one more step! We need to resize the filesystem to fill our new partition space. For this we will use “sudo resize2fs /dev/sda2”:

sudo resize2fs /dev/sda2 resize2fs 1.44.5 (15-Dec-2018) Filesystem at /dev/sda2 is mounted on /; on-line resizing required old_desc_blocks = 1, new_desc_blocks = 15 The filesystem on /dev/sda2 is now 62448214 (4k) blocks long.

Now let’s check df -h again:

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/root 235G 1.3G 224G 1% / devtmpfs 1.8G 0 1.8G 0% /dev tmpfs 2.0G 0 2.0G 0% /dev/shm tmpfs 2.0G 8.5M 1.9G 1% /run tmpfs 5.0M 4.0K 5.0M 1% /run/lock tmpfs 2.0G 0 2.0G 0% /sys/fs/cgroup /dev/mmcblk0p1 253M 52M 201M 21% /boot tmpfs 391M 0 391M 0% /run/user/1000

And that’s it! You will now be using all of your space on your drive.

Verify SSD Functionality / Performance

You can make sure everything is running correctly (and as fast as it should be) by running my quick storage benchmark. You can run the benchmark with the following one-liner:

sudo curl https://raw.githubusercontent.com/TheRemote/PiBenchmarks/master/Storage.sh 

Related Videos

Understanding your PerformanceTest Benchmark Results

Notice: Undefined variable: z_bot in /sites/homeover.us/crack-key-for/as-ssd-benchmark-scores-crack-key-for-u.php on line 107

Notice: Undefined variable: z_empty in /sites/homeover.us/crack-key-for/as-ssd-benchmark-scores-crack-key-for-u.php on line 107

0 Replies to “As ssd benchmark scores - Crack Key For U”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *